Queen Elizabeth is reportedly “deeply upset” that her grandson Prince Harry has been relentlessly attacking the British royal family, and she’s taking the situation “very personally,” a source is saying.

“Harry’s grandmother has taken this very personally and is deeply upset by what Harry has said, in particular his comments about Charles’s parenting and suggesting his father knows no better because of how he was brought up. It has been a very upsetting time,” the insider told Daily Mail.

This comes after Harry attacked his father Prince Charles in his new mental health docuseries “The Me You Can’t See.”

“My father used to say to me when I was younger … ‘Well, it was like that for me, so it’s going to be like that for you,’” Harry, 36, told Oprah Winfrey. “That doesn’t make sense — just because you suffered, that doesn’t mean that your kids have to suffer, in fact quite the opposite. If you suffered, do everything you can to make sure that whatever negative experiences that you had, you can make it right for your kids.”

Another source said that despite everything that has happened, Charles does not want to cut off his son.

“Charles will want to engage, but it’s fair to say what Harry has said in both interviews with Oprah has been seen as very callous within the family. If Harry was to attack the Queen in a more personal way, Charles would close ranks with the Queen without a doubt and Harry would be out in the cold,” the source said. “Charles is such a gentle man and a dedicated father first and foremost. He’ll be feeling wretched. He wants to seek a reconciliation. He is not vindictive at all.”

Last week, Harry said he wants to be a different kind of father to his own children than Charles was to him.

“Isn’t life about breaking the cycle?” Harry, 36, said while appearing on Dax Shepard’s “Armchair Expert” podcast on Thursday. “There’s no blame. I don’t think anyone should be pointing the finger and blaming anyone. Certainly, when it comes to parenting, if I’ve experienced some form of pain and suffering because of the pain and suffering that perhaps my father or parents suffered. I’m gonna make sure I break that cycle so that I don’t pass it on.”

He added that “a lot of genetic pain and suffering gets passed on anyway. As parents, we should try and make sure we’re doing the most we can. Like, ‘That happened to me. I’m gonna make sure that doesn’t happen to you.’”

Recommended
Join the Discussion

COMMENT POLICY: We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment!